SteelSeries SP

Peripherals

SteelSeries

SteelSeries SP Pro Gaming
Click to enlarge

The pad is packaged in a simple zip-seal bag made out of the material similar to a rain coat, and it has the feeling of quality when you first pick it up. It’s obviously designed to be hanging in a shop store, considering the rack loop at the top of the bag. The front has a large sticker explaining how this pad is remarkably better than the competition with black and orange being the primary colours.

The rear explains in more detail and in several languages for gamers across the globe. The pad has been design in association with SK Gaming, mousesports, Pentagram G-Shock and finally WNV gaming, which I’ve personally never heard of but to someone I’m sure they’ll instil a sense of quality.

SteelSeries SP Pro Gaming
Click to enlarge

Inside the bag, you’ll find the mouse pad itself, a SteelSeries sticker and another bag of Glide MS mouse feet. While it’s nice that SteelSeries have packaged some feet with the pad, if you have a high-end gaming mouse, you’ll find little use for them as your existing mouse feet are perfectly capable.

SteelSeries SP Pro Gaming
Click to enlarge

SteelSeries SP Pro Gaming
Click to enlarge

The pad itself is a similar shape to the S&S pad we reviewed last year, it’s a rounded rectangle with a round cut-out at the bottom for your arm to rest on. The pad has what looks like a 3D version of the SteelSeries logo in the background, and a full logo in the bottom left corner in light grey. The designed is actually printed behind the surface and it’s a grid of black and white pixels in an ordered fashion. The top of the pad is a 2mm clear plastic layer which has small rounded peaks and troughs which gives the pad as a whole a rough texture. This top layer has a rounded bevel on the edges so no part of the pad is sharp, and it won’t dig into your wrists during a hefty gaming spree.

SteelSeries SP Pro Gaming
Click to enlarge

As the top is see-thru and doesn’t have a smooth surface, you can’t focus on the image behind as your eyes are looking at two different angles. It’s like looking at a magic eye illustration as a result; the stock imagery on their site looks nothing like the pad in person. The idea appears to be that the top rough surface gives the mouse something to register when you are moving the mouse across it, while the grid background will stop the mouse getting confused about similar peaks or troughs on the surface.

The whole pad is 4mm thick, with the rear rubber backing making up the final 2mm of the mouse mat. This is the usual grooved black rubber which does a good job of anchoring your mouse pad during your frag sessions. It measures to be a medium-sized 320mm x 270mm (12.6” x 10.6”) which should be more than enough for most high-DPI gamers while still fitting on your desk.

Looking at the compatibility, this pad is designed for optical and laser mice, while roller balls aren’t mentioned. As there are few people who have a roller-ball mouse and game, it seems pointless designing a pad that provides support for this technology. With laser and optical mouse being the gamers choice, hopefully the rather strange looking surface will do the trick.

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Last modified: February 15, 2011

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