Razer Onza Tournament Edition

Mice, Peripherals

Product Features

The Razer Onza comes in two different editions (not counting the Dragon Age Onza, which is just the Tournament Edition with Dragon Age decals); the Standard Edition and Tournament Edition. The difference between the two is that the TE has a braided cable for extra durability, a rubberised coating for additional grip, backlit buttons and thumbsticks with adjustable tension.

The Onza is definitely a nice looking bit of kit, with a sleek matte black look with the Razer logo on the side.

Razer Onza Tournament Edition

Click to Enlarge

The cable is pretty decent quality; longer than the standard Microsoft cable and with a fabric finish, it also has an in-line release connector like the official Microsoft XBox and XBox 360 controllers.

Razer Onza Tournament Edition

Click to Enlarge

The main coloured buttons are backlit and use Razer’s so-called “Hyperesponse” technology, replacing Microsoft’s membrane buttons with lower profile buttons that use microswitches, with less of a strike distance and a mouse-style click with each press.

Razer Onza Tournament Edition

Click to Enlarge

The thumbsticks have tension controls just underneath the top surface, which can be adjusted by rotating them clockwise to increase the tension, or anti-clockwise to reduce it. These make a notable difference and have a ratcheting click as they are adjusted.

Razer Onza Tournament Edition

Click to Enlarge

The D-Pad has also been replaced with four separate directional buttons, which still use membrane buttons but provide better precision.

Razer Onza Tournament Edition

Click to Enlarge

The triggers on the back of the controller are curved out to look and feel a little more like gun triggers, which gives them the feel of a slightly longer draw distance depending where your fingers are resting.

One of the most notable features of the Onza is the two programmable bumper buttons. Sitting above the regular bumper buttons, the programmable buttons allow you to set each one to any other button on the controller, then use those buttons instead. These buttons work well and are useful in a lot of games, though their inclusion lead to the controller being banned by Major League Gaming (MLG) due to not being able to trust people hacking rapid fire or macro functionality into the additional buttons.

Razer Onza Tournament Edition

Click to Enlarge

The programmable buttons are configured via the back panel, where a button is held down on each side while another button is pressed, lighting up the panel on the back to indicate which has been mapped.

Razer Onza Tournament Edition

Click to Enlarge

The Back and Start buttons have been moved from the middle of the face to the bottom of the controller. This change is fine and the buttons remain unobtrusive, though muscle memory tends to lead to stretching for the now empty space where the buttons used to be. There doesn’t seem to be a reason to have moved them, as they weren’t getting in the way before or now.

Razer Onza Tournament Edition

Click to Enlarge

One notable difference in the headphone jack is that it doesn’t appear to have the connector slots at either side that the Microsoft controllers have, which mean that many existing official and unofficial peripherals, such as the XBox Messenger Kit keyboard and the older Microsoft headsets may not be compatible.

Previous Next

Last modified: May 11, 2014

Previous Story

Audio, Peripherals

Plantronics Gamecom X95 Xbox

Physical Features The X95 is in almost every way, the X40. It’s the same headset, but with wireless....

Next Story

Audio, Peripherals

Plantronics Gamecom X30

Physical Features When you get yourself in to the horrible packaging, you find that you have what looks like...

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.