Nuke-Z Z8

Peripherals

Testing

The pad was put through our normal mouse pad test, which is outlined here. Below is the result.

Nuke-Z

As you can see, the pad tracks almost perfectly which is excellect news for any gamer.

Once the pad was in its new home, it was put through its paces with the usual set of mice: Saitek GM3200 (3200DPI laser), Razer Deathadder (1800DPI infrared), Razer Krait (1600DPI optical), Ideazon Reaper (optical) and a generic roller ball (not pictured).

Nuke-Z
Click to enlarge

To test the pad, I used the above mice in several different scenarios to see how it fared. First of all, it was a couple of image editing runs using Photoshop to determine how accurate it was on small movements. I use a 1600×1200 resolution and a high sensitivity meaning that the mouse pad has to be perfect to stop the cursor from jumping around.

With every mouse tested, bar the roller ball, there was no issue. The pad has a small amount of friction, meaning that you have to put in a little more effort to move the cursor than compared to say, the NO.ID set of pads. The claim that the makers of this pad make about the fact that you need little energy to start moving the mouse so your cursor doesn’t jump when you start moving the mouse isn’t quite correct. You need less force than a standard pad, but the effect is still there.

During game tests, this ‘stick-slip’ (as Nuke-Z call it) isn’t noticeable at all, and this pad was at least on par with any other that we have tested.

In Command and Conquer: Zero Hour, the mouse pad performed admirably and every movement was recreated perfectly by all of the mice that were used.

The FPS test, which uses Battlefield 2142, is the true test of any mouse pad. During a first person shooter, you need to have a surface that always reproduces the correct movements onscreen, the slightest error will mean one less kill and one more death. When using the Nuke-Z, there were no problems and the pad was, for all intents and purposes, perfect.

While not a performance changing function, having the pad hanging over your desk edge stops your wrist being sliced during game play. The surface of the pad also absorbs your sweat during play stopping you from feeling uncomfortable after a long killing session.

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Last modified: February 15, 2011

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