Intel Core i5 750

Bloomfield, Lynnfield & Clarkdale

Intel’s new processor naming scheme is supposed to be much easier to understand than its previous CPU ranges with them admitting they have far too many names, brands, and platforms. On the contrary though, it seems that the i7/i5/i3 processors are just are hard to get your head around. So we’ll have a quick go at clarifying a few things…

Let’s start in at the deep end with the Core i7 range. These Nehalem-based processors are all codenamed Bloomfield using the LGA1366 socket and supporting triple channel DRR3 memory. The CPU’s are quad core based but through hyper-threading have a total of 8 cores.

The Core i5 750 fits into the Lynnfield category which includes the Core i7-800 and Core i5-700 series – confusing I know. The first three Lynnfield’s to hit the market are going to be the i5-750, i7-860 and i7-870 all using the LGA1156 socket.

Finally, the Clarkdale range is made up of the Core i5-600 and Core i3-500 ranges and is apparently set for release in Q1 2010.

Bloomfield
Lynnfield Clarkdale
Core i7-900 Series
Core i7-975/965/960/940/950/920]
Core i7-800 Series

Core i5-700 Series
Core i5-600 Series
Core i3-500 Series

Intel Core i5-750

The Core i5-700 series is a little different from the high performing i7-900 processors which use Intel’s QuickPath InterConnect (QPI) giving a quick route from the CPU to communicate with other components. This technology is not found in the Lynnfield CPU’s but they do use Direct Media Interface (DMI) – a point-to-point interconnection between the Northbridge and Southbridge.

Moreover, despite the i5-700’s being quad core based they do not support Hyper Threading and so the thread count is equal to the number of cores, in this case 4.

As with the i7-920, the i5-750 has a BLCK frequency of 133 and a multiplier of 20 giving a stock speed of 2.66GHz. Unfortunately the multiplier is locked but the Turbo Boost, if enabled, can push the multiplier up to 24. Therefore, at the stock BLCK of 133 you can achieve a clock of 3.2GHz, although this is only on a single core. Using more cores the multiplier drops down by one each time. So, utilising all four cores the highest possible multiplier is 21.


Click to enlarge


Click to enlarge

Looking a little more specifically at the caches, each core of the 750 features 32KB of L1 data cache, 32KB of instruction cache and 256KB of L2 cache. The processor does have a total of 8MB of L3 cache though.

As with the i7-920, the i5-750 has a BLCK frequency of 133 and a multiplier of 20 giving a stock speed of 2.66GHz. Unfortunately the multiplier is locked but the Turbo Boost, if enabled, can push the multiplier up to 21. Therefore, at the stock BLCK of 133 you can achieve a clock of 2.8GHz.

The new processor has a dual channel DDR3 controller but unfortunately at the stock speed of 2.66GHz, the maximum DRAM frequency available is 1333MHz using the 2:10 divider. Therefore to utilise 1600MHz or more, the BLCK frequency must be raised to at least 160, if not higher.

Multi-GPUs are supported too with the PCI-e controller providing 16 PCI-e channels so x16, x8 + x8 are both supported. Moreover, with the PCH chipset containing 8 PCI-e slots, six channels are available as two are used by Wi-Fi and Gigabyte Ethernet. Of course it depends on the motherboard whether SLI is supported by it seems likely that most P55’s will.

0 responses to “Intel Core i5 750”

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.