NZXT Tempest 210

Cases

Testing

Methodology

Since there doesn’t exist a synthetic benchmark for how good cable management is yet, I’m afraid you’ll have to run with my own experiences with the case. Focusing on a few key features, such as strength, noise and cooling and anything else that springs to mind, I’ll run down my views of the chassis and tell you what I think.

Results

Strength

For such a light case, I was actually pretty impressed with how sturdy it is. If you put a reasonable ammount of pressure on it, there is some warping of the left hand side but there’s not much at all. The side panels are also very strong indeed. It takes a lot to make them flex and impacts are similarly shrugged off.

I would be more than happy for the 210 to protect my internal hardware.

Noise and Cooling

Two fans is pretty much the minimum you would want for any basic cooling setup. I’d prefer to see it as one intake and one exhaust to aid a wind tunnel like effect, but you can easily move them around to create the configuration you prefer. 2 fans is enough to get things started, but there’s also plenty of space for additionals. You can add two the front, another in the top panel, perhaps a couple in side and even one in the floor if you want. There’s also space for WC radiators if you want them.

It almost seems a shame that NZXT didn’t use more of their own fans though, because they are in-fact pretty damn quiet. They move a reasonably ammount of air too, only really becoming audible if you get your ear right next to them. If you went out of your way to add some sound proofing material to the side panels and exposed panelling, you could have a near silent case with the Tempest 210.

Features

Cable management is pretty strong in the 210. There’s plenty of holes in the motherboard tray that allow for cable routing, each of them also has rounded edges to prevent cable shearing and finger cuts. There’s a good 3/4″ of space behind the mobo tray, so there’s plenty of room for cables and there’s a nice number of little hooks for attaching cable ties too. I was also pleased to see that the front panel cabling was pre-managed, meaning you don’t need to make that your first job when building your new PC.

Plenty of toolless systems in this case and they work very well, holding HDDs and ODD with ease. On top of this, they’re located only on one side of the drive bays, meaning you only need remove one side panel to change out any drives.

I was also pleased to see that there’s an internal USB 3.0 connector on the front of this case. This is good future proofing and there’s no real reason not to include this on contemporary chassis; except if you’re cost cutting. Impressively since this is a budget case, NZXT saw fit to include one.

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Last modified: October 20, 2011

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