NZXT Rogue

Cases

Rogue

NZXT Rogue
Click to enlarge

The Rogue is packaged in the usual design of black and a nice picture of the case with the LED’s turned on. You can get the Rogue in a couple of different colours, with black or silver for the outer case, and then either red or blue LED lighting.

Once out of the box, it’s not immediately obvious that the case is made out of aluminium, as it actually weighs a lot. Granted its 3mm thick, but its certainly no anorexic Lian Li number.

With the case, you get a fairly random array of extras. First are all the screws that you’ll need to install your motherboard and the drives, the others include a PSU expanding bracket, and a bunch of 5.25” rails. You also get a LAN carrying strap that turns the Rogue into a handbag to ease transportation.

External

Front

NZXT Rogue
Click to enlarge

NZXT Rogue
Click to enlarge

The case itself uses the same formula that has served NZXT well with their previous cases; the front door. It has a lump in the middle which then has three horizontal slits at the bottom; just above the white NZXT logo. This time it pretty much covers the entire front of the case, with two LED bars flanking it on either side. The front has a brushed finished which feels and looks pretty good, and the same goes for the metal behind.

NZXT Rogue
Click to enlarge

The door itself is mounted on a hinge that allows it to open fully which is nice to see, and useful when you are trying to insert a DVD or similar; although there is a bright silver screw at the top which isn’t really in keeping with the black front.

A downside to having this large door is that if you have anything in front of the case, you won’t be able to open it the whole way as it requires a far amount of clearance to swing around. While this is probably a minor point to most, it’s something to bare in mind if you are short on space.

NZXT Rogue
Click to enlarge

NZXT Rogue
Click to enlarge

This door is held closed by a magnet which has some damage either side which is obvious from the worn, bare aluminium by it. Just to the left of this magnet are the I/O ports, which instead of the usual setup doesn’t have a FireWire port but instead an E-SATA socket. Personally, this is a great idea, as I have never used FireWire in my life while I’ve wanted E-SATA. This time, NZXT haven’t gone for the hiding approach and instead have decided to put them in plan sight, and in a place where you can easily access them.

Sides

NZXT Rogue
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Both sides of the Rogue are made of the same thick aluminium as the front, and have a similar finish although they feel slightly smoother. They have a curved top which gives the Rogue its unique shape, and they a large area which is completely covered with fins which look similar to a low-profile heatsink. Two large 120mm holes have been cut behind, meaning that there is space for airflow, while retaining the fins as fan grills. On the left-hand side, you’ll find that the rear spot is occupied by a plain black 120mm fan with a black dust filter attached, while the opposite side panel has another 120mm fan but no dust filter. It becomes obvious then that the dust filter side sucks air in, while the other blows air out. These fans face each other meaning that there will be a tunnel of cooling air passing directly over your motherboard. These side panels can be removed so that you can access the internals of the case much easier.

NZXT Rogue
Click to enlarge

The top of the case is made of much thinner (~1-2mm thick) aluminium which has an A5 sized Perspex window inset into it. This allows you to take a spy at the inner workings of your PC without needed to take this panel off. A windowed case is a necessity if you are to hold your honour at a LAN party, although you could just use a NZXT sword instead.

Rear

NZXT Rogue
Click to enlarge

Looking round the back of the case, aluminium isn’t the only thing similar to Lian Li. There are plenty of thumbscrews each holding a certain part in place. Looking at the power supply area, there is a bracket that can be removed in order to slide your power supply into the case from the rear. This is where the other provided bracket comes into place. It allows you to use a longer-than-average power supply unit with the case as it gives you an extra couple of centimetres of room to use, although it’ll stick out the back.

To the side of this you’ll find the LED equipped 120mm fan which blows air out of the case meaning there is no need for a dust filter. Below this is the removable motherboard tray which is very handy in a case of this size as you can work on your PC outside where there is much more space. That said the height restriction on the CPU cooler might mean that you decide to install it after you’ve slid the mobo tray back into place giving the tray a limited use.

Amusingly, although you can lock the top panel and the front door, there is no way to prevent someone coming up to your PC, removing the thumbscrews and running off with your motherboard in the tray. The same goes for the power supply bracket. Perhaps that would be a more important place to put a padlock loop? If you don’t care for security, you can take the top padlock loop off by removing the small screw beneath it.

Bottom

NZXT Rogue
Click to enlarge

While you’ll probably never see the bottom of the case, it’s still coloured black with a matt finish. The case sits on four long rubber feet which are on the ridges on either side of the case. These feet will easily prevent vibration from the case being passed onto whatever you choose to place the case on, which is important if it’s in a cabinet or on a laminate floor.

Internal

Once you’ve removed the thumbscrew that holds the top in place, you’ll be able to slide it off and gain access to the internals. While it seems like an unnecessary extra, simply having the insides coloured the same as the outside, rather than boring grey metal makes this case feel that little bit more special. More importantly, with the windows on the top of the case, the coloured inside will look that much better.

NZXT Rogue
Click to enlarge

NZXT Rogue
Click to enlarge

You’ll find some interesting methods of sighting the HDD’s; they sit perpendicularly either side of the 5.25” bays, maximising the available space. All of the bays have rubber strips that are hard to the touch and are in the wrong position to prevent any vibration from being passed onto the chassis, and are more likely just there to grip the drive as you insert it. Each of the bays has fins on them which make them look like small heatsinks. While this might just be a cosmetic addition, it may well help keep your data-storing drives cooler especially considering as they are made of aluminium.

NZXT Rogue
Click to enlarge

The rear PCI slot covers are screw in ones which is nice to see, as you won’t have an empty hole if you were to twist out the wrong one. They don’t have any tool-less system which will make a screwdriver a prerequisite, the same goes for the HDD bays and the external 3.5” bay too. The 5.25” drive bays have an interesting rail system that doesn’t look like a great deal of effort has been put into making them, as they are just a small stamped piece of metal.

NZXT Rogue
Click to enlarge

A nice little feature of the I/O PCB is that the cables can be removed if you don’t use them. For example, I for one never use the audio ports and it’s nice to be able to remove the cable from the system to reduce clutter.

The motherboard area is sited in an area that’ll allow you to mount a couple of 8800 Ultra’s if your wallet (and mATX motherboard) will allow, making it suitable for LANer’s. The standoffs are all preinstalled making one less job for you to do when installing.

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Last modified: February 15, 2011

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