NZXT Lexa Blackline

Cases

Overview cont.

NZXT Lexa Blackline
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NZXT Lexa Blackline
Click to enlarge

The top of the case has another fan, this time an 80mm version which expels warm rising air from your case to the outside world. As a result it doesn’t require a dust filter. The front 120mm fan does however and fortunately does have a dust filter. There are two more 120mm fans, one positioned behind a silver grill on the side window, and another at the rear. There is space for one more 80mm fan if you so please located on the floor of the case which is covered with yet another filter. None of these fans have been treated to some vibration killing goodness and I would expect them to pass their rotational vibration to the case itself which is unfortunate.

NZXT Lexa Blackline
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All of these fans are toted as being silent rotating at 1200RPM and spitting out a mere 23dBA. I think that the RPM values are only true for the 120mm fans, rather than the 80mm. To create the lighting for the case, no cold cathodes or the like are used and instead the rear 120mm and the side 120 fan have the coloured LED’s in them. These can either be blue or red depending on the case version that you purchased; it’ll be red for me.

NZXT Lexa Blackline
Click to enlarge

NZXT Lexa Blackline
Click to enlarge

The side panel which contains the window is skirted by silver bars which are on three sides, apart from the rear which contains the hefty handle which is proudly sporting a large white ‘NZXT’ logo. Next to the handle is a small lock which will prevent the side panel being removed by an opportunistic thief. This handle slides forward to allow the side panel to be removed, but first you’ll have to remove the two case screws from the rear.

These case screws go through the rear curved ‘cable management’ cage which keeps the case looking like the front. However, it’s a pain in the ass, and is ridiculously unneeded. I can’t see how it’s a cable management system for the various plugs that you need to connect to the rear of your motherboard. This cage is purely for looks and nothing to do with cable management, and in the first department it does the trick as the case would look unbalanced without it. If you do find it too annoying, it can be removed.

NZXT Lexa Blackline
Click to enlarge

NZXT Lexa Blackline
Click to enlarge

The rear of the case is the standard layout with the power supply at the top, motherboard hole with a 120mm next to it with 7 PCI slots below. It seems that pre-drilled water cooling holes are becoming the norm with gamer cases, and the Blackline follows this tread having two grommet-filled holes on the right side of the PCI slots.

NZXT Lexa Blackline
Click to enlarge

Pop of the side panel, and you can get a good look-see internally of the Blackline. There is nothing out of the ordinary, with four 5.25” bays, a couple of 3.5” slots and five holes for some side panel facing hard discs. All of these drive bays use snap on drive rails which make installation fast, quick and most importantly, screwdriver free.

The motherboard area is quite clear although there is a case strengthening bar that runs across the power supply slot which makes installation of your power supply a bit of a pain, as you’ll have to do it before your motherboard. The motherboard area is big enough and provides mounting holes for ATX, flex ATX, mini ATX and micro ATX which is more than enough for the average user.

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Last modified: August 15, 2011

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