NZXT Hades

Cases

NZXT Hades – Internals

Naturally, the NZXT Hades uses thumbscrews for detaching the side panels and gaining entry to the internal chambers. Once inside, it’s evident the case is split into two parts: a large chamber for the motherboard and power supply with the drives towards the front stacked vertically – essentially it’s a simple yet uncluttered layout.


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A total of nine 5.25” drives are catered for in the Hades although only four can be accessed through the front by opening the door. The first six bays are all accompanied by installation clips (eliminating the need for screws); the lower bays require screws.

Okay so that’s the DVD drives sorted but what about the hard drives? Well, the HDDs actually still occupy a 5.25” slot via a 5.25” to 3.5” adapter and several thumbscrews; this does limit the total amount of hard drives to four but installation is very easy.

With the HDDs installed at the bottom of the drive bay column, they sit directly behind the 200mm intake fan thus providing ample cooling even with a multiple drive RAID configuration.


Click to enlarge


Click to enlarge

Moving to the motherboard tray, there’s plenty of holes provided for cable management purposes and a larger cut-out to allow for a CPU cooler back plate to be fitted without first having to remove the board.

The smaller holes are also fitted with rubber flaps to feed cables through which should neaten the appearance somewhat.


Click to enlarge


Click to enlarge

Whilst on the subject of cabling and tidiness, it’s good to see that NZXT have routed the cables from the exhaust fans behind the motherboard tray preventing them from cluttering the main chamber.

The rear exhaust fans are accompanied by a side-mounted 200mm intake fan (both intake fans are fitted with filters). The fan controller knobs at the front help to control the performance/noise ratio of these fans with the temperature sensors providing useful information as to whether the fan speed should be increased/decreased.
In total, there are three sensors each labelled with a specified location (CPU, HDD or system) with the temperatures shown on a small digital display on the front of the chassis.


Click to enlarge


Click to enlarge

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Last modified: February 15, 2011

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