Testing

 

Installation

Installing the Nesteq was simple enough. It’s not overly large so there was no size issues and it’s modular cables meant there was less to get caught in the nooks and crannies during the install. The braid around the cables also made it easier for cable management, as not only do the cables look better but there streamlined nature makes it harder for them to snag.

 

Methodology

Testing power supplies is a fairly simple process compared to other products. The unit is hooked up to the most powerful hardware we have available at the time, and left in an idle state for 30 minutes. After that time, we use speedfan to measure the stability of the rails, and a PF and wattage meter for their results respectively. Then, the PC(s) that the unit is powering are loaded as far as they can go to guarantee maximum power draw, and the results are taken again.

The rig setup used to test power supplies, usually involves one main PC powered by the unit, and a secondary PC of which the HDDs, optical drives and graphics cards are powered by the PSU being tested.

The setup used:

Main PC

ProcessorIntel Core 2 Duo E6600 @ 3.156 GHZ
MotherboardMSI P6N Diamond 680i
RAMSuper Talent 4gb PC8000
HDDWD Raptor 75gb, WD Caviar SE 80GB

Second PC

ProcessorIntel Core 2 Duo E6750 @ 3.2 GHZ
MotherboardGigabyte P35T-DQ6 rev. 1.0
RAMCrucial DDR3 12800 2GB @ 1600 MHZ
HDDMaxtor DiamondMax 20 80GB SATA
 

Results

Rail
Idle
Load
3.3v3.413.39
5.0v5.05.05
12.0v12.4112.32

Under both idle and load the Nesteq performs very well with some very stable rails; the 3.3 and 5.0v ones specifically. Unfortunately the 12v is out by a fair chunk but was better at load than at idle.

Rail
Standby
Idle
Load
PF Rating0.50.840.9
Wattage3191303

PF ratings are a way of telling how efficient a PSU is at converting AC mains voltage to DC for your PC. If you’d like to read more, check out our glossary entry here.

While the test setup may not have pulled that many watts from the unit, it just shows that the manufacturers recommended PSU wattages are a little off.

 

Cost

The Nesteq 700w isn’t the cheapest of units around at £115 for "only" 700w. Most 600w and 700w PSUs can be found for between 60 and 100 pounds.

 

Noise and Cooling

Throughout operation the Nesteq was almost inaudible. The supplied, large fan only really spins up if the EECS begins to get a bit warm, and even then you can only hear it with your ear pressed against the side. There is a slight electronic whine from the unit like many others, however, you can only hear this one when up close, and once it’s enclosed inside a case it becomes irrelevant.

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