December 15th, 2011

Corepad Keira

Testing

Methodology

It can be difficult to test any type of non-electronic peripheral, since there’s rarely a standard by which to set them. Nevertheless, I tried my best. Since it’s a gaming mouse mat, I decided to test it out by gaming and a bit of normal PC use.
I used the CoolerMaster Storm Sentinel Advance mouse in order to test this mouse mat. With a variety of DPI options and a variable weight, I could get a semi-decent idea of what it might be like for various types of user.

Results

Gaming

I’ve already mentioned how the micro-textured surface gives excellent quality DPI tracking as well as an incredibly smooth glide. If you’re used to cloth mouse mats, or even no mat at all, then you’ll notice a major difference.

I used a couple of FPS games (Team Fortress 2 and Modern Warfare 3 specifically) to start with. Diving straight into multiplayer where precision mouse movement can be the decider between a killstreak and a quick visit to the respawn timer, I got excellent response at both mid-range and high DPI settings. The glide was quite noticeable when I switched to some basic sniping; the lack of obtrusion on my gaming surface meant that there were no minor hiccups whilst I lined up my shots.

I also had a play around on Allods Online for a while, a rather traditional MMORPG. Precision mattered a lot less when all you’ve got to do is click on buttons every now and then. All the detailed texture in this situation was offering me was very, very slightly less effort when I moved my mouse.

Comfort

Despite being so thin, the Keira’s one downfall in comfort is the ever so slightly raised edges. I sat down for a long, relaxed gaming session which ended with me having to find something to pad my wrists with. Whilst the edges aren’t exactly sharp, per se, they do stick into your skin enough to leave marks and minor irritation. Short sessions, such as quick blasts on multiplayer games didn’t present any problems and I was more than satisfied with the Keira.

Cost

At 21 euros, you can easily pick up the Keira for anywhere between £16 and £20 which is a rather nice price for this gaming surface. Some mouse mats can fetch up to £40 brand new so you’re not looking at a bad price at all for such a high quality surface.

Conclusion

For competitive multiplayer gaming, or LAN gaming I’d definitely consider the Keira as my mouse mat of choice. It’s got all the features that you need to help give you that edge: brilliant DPI tracking without any rough obtrusive textures, light weight, stable, affordable.

Not many online retailers have picked up stocks of Corepad’s peripherals, so you may have some trouble tracking down somewhere to buy this product, price checking is somewhat simpler because of that, but it’s also harder to track down a good deal.

It’s definitely a good mouse mat (Just check out the pros to cons). Corepad have put together a mouse that is evidently for gamers and competitive gamers at that.

So, when you break it down:

Pros

  • Amazing textured main surface for optical mice
  • Reverse surface has great grip on desks/flat surfaces
  • Entire structure is lightweight but sturdy
  • Cheap compared to many other gaming mouse mats

Cons

  • Uncomfortable on the wrists, can cause some irritation
  • Only available from online retailers

Overall, the Keira has earned itself an 8/10 from me. Despite how great all its features are, it still has the very unfortunate problem of wrist irritation.

 

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Peripherals