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Jetart SL1600 & SL1800 Slim CPU coolers

Jetart SL1600 SL1800

Introduction

Here on XSReviews.co.uk, we have reviewed many Jetart products, but never a CPU cooler. Today I have a couple of their slim LGA775 coolers compatible with today’s Core 2 Duo technology. Let’s see how they perform.

Specs and Description

SL1600SL1800
Cooler dimensions 82.0 x 80.8 x 25.5mm82.0 x 80.8 x 36.0mm
Fan dimensions

70.0 x 70.0 x 10.0mm

70.0 x 70.0 x 10.0mm
Heatsink dimensions 78.5 x 80.0 x 12.5mm78.5 x 80.0 x 23.5mm
Heatsink material Full copperFull copper
Bearing type Ball bearingBall bearing
Weight366g497g
AccessoriesThermal greaseThermal grease

The Cooler

Arriving in an unmarked OEM boxes, it seems that these coolers are destined for the system builder market, rather than off-the-shelf retail.

Jetart SL1600 SL1800

In the box you get a small sachet of grey heatpaste (looks similar to Arctic Silver 5), a pack of 4 screw springs, the heatsink itself, and the mounting bracket. There are no instructions included.

The coolers are simple and attractive, merging together the black surround with the shiny copper heatsink below. There is a low profile 70mm fan on both of the heatsinks.

Jetart SL1600 SL1800
SL1600
Jetart SL1600 SL1800
SL1800

The SL1800 and SL1600 are dubbed as slim, low profile cooling solutions (25mm and 36mm respectively), which is particular interest to anyone that is interested in making a HTPC or other small form factor PCs. The coolers are just that, slim-line. Reminiscent of old Pentium coolers, they are the most basic type of cooler; block of copper with fins, and a fan stuck on top. Both coolers are made of just 3 parts (excluding mounting bracket).

Jetart SL1600 SL1800
Jetart SL1600 SL1800

On the bottom of the heatsinks, there is a blue plastic sheet that protects the CPU contact point from dust, grease and other pollutants that could affect its performance. The bottom of the heatsinks isn’t the best. They are flat, which is the key concern, but they aren’t going to replace your bathroom mirror in a hurry. It’s better than other coolers, but still leaves much to be desired.

Weight-wise the heatsinks are quite heavy. Weighing in at 366g and 487g for the SL1600 and SL1800 respectively. This is due to the block of copper that the coolers are made of. That said, the SL1600 and SL1800 are far from going to stress your motherboard. The way that the heatsinks mount, means that there is little leverage that a taller heatsink would command, and hence there is a lot lower likelihood that you are going to run into problems during, say, transportation.

Jetart SL1600 SL1800

Speaking of mounting method, Jetart have decided to employ their own mounting bracket. This combined with 4 screws with springs attached makes for what looks like an easy install.

Jetart SL1600 SL1800

The 70mm fan mounted on both heatsinks connects with a standard 3-pin fan. A standard 3-pin fan has a ground pin, 12v pin and a speed sensor pin. This means that the fan has power and sends the speed sensor signal to the motherboard. The mobo uses this to compute the rotational speed of the fan (RPM). The newer fourth pin introduces PWM (Pulse Wave Modulation). This is a signal that the mobo sends TO the fan telling it at what speed to rotate at. This means that your motherboard can accurately change the fans speed depending on, the internal temperature of the PC. The older way of motherboards controlling fan speed was to change the input voltage, however this can be dangerous as it could cause the fan to stop spinning. A 4-pin connector would have been nice to see on the Jetart SL1600/SL1800 as this is the new technology that is being introduced.

Testing

To test the heatsinks, I used an Asus P5W-DH deluxe motherboard, and a Conroe E6600 at stock speed. The heatsink was used with both the included heatpaste and Artic Silver 5.

Installation was simple. Take out your motherboard put the bracket on the back, and slot the heatsink on top. Then tighten the screws on the bracket. All done and ready to test.

Jetart SL1600 SL1800
Jetart SL1600 SL1800

To test the heastinks, I used CPUBurn-in with Folding@home running which will stress both cores (both were running at 100%). This was left for 30 minutes. I then restarted the PC and left it for 30 minutes with nothing running to get the idle temperature. This was repeated for the stock and then the Artic Silver 5 heatpastes.

Supplied Jetart thermal compound

SL1600 /C

SL1800 /C

Ambient

19

19

Idle

28

26

Load

39

35

Artic Silver 5

SL1600 /C

SL1800 /C

Ambient

19

19

Idle

27

26

Load

37

34

As you can see, both heatsinks performed admirably and even more so when coupled with the performance heatpaste Artic Silver 5. Considering their tiny size, they both managed to pull results that are more than acceptable.

The fans aren’t noisy (i.e. audible over average case volume) but could pose a problem for ultra-silent cases. I would class these fans as silent (the word silent these days means quiet).

After completing these tests, I tried a little overclocking with the SL1800. A very quick fiddle with the BIOS gave use 2.7ghz while still keeping respectable temperatures.

Since the testing was completed, I decided to remove the mounting bracket, and I found that the it had firmly stuck itself to the back of the motherboard. After 10 minutes of fighting with the foam pad, I eventually used a knife and managed to get the bracket off.

Jetart SL1600 SL1800

You do not need to remove the plastic that covers the foam sticker which is probably a good plan if you want to ever change the heatshink to another one.

Conclusion

The Jetart SL1800 and SL1600 do exactly what they say on the tin; slim-line cooling. They manage to get decent results while maintaining a low profile. Definitely worth a look if you are creating a HTPC.

ProsCons
Simple designVolume
Great cooling abilityWon’t support a heavy overclock
Easy install

I’d like to thank Jetart for providing us with the review sample

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