in Cases

Coolermaster HAF 932 Advanced

Testing

Methodology

Since there doesn’t exist a synthetic benchmark for how good cable management is yet, I’m afraid you’ll have to run with my own experiences with the case. Focusing on a few key features, such as strength, noise and cooling and anything else that springs to mind, I’ll run down my views of the chassis and tell you what I think.

Results

Strength

This is one strong case. Apart from some slight potential for twist warping in the side panels – really when’s that going to happen? – the HAF 932 is about as tough as you can get a PC case. Unless you’re slinging you’re rig down a flight of stairs, all your internals will be well protected.

Noise and Cooling

For a case with several large fans, you would expect things to be cool and quiet and you’d be right. While none of the fans move a huge ammount of air by themselves, when in tandem there’s a good wind tunnel effect going on that should keep even the warmest of hardware at operational temperatures. Noise wise as well things stay incredibly quiet with just a mild hum from the whole system that is at a pitch that will be very unlikely to annoy; an easy to miss background sound. It isn’t 100% silent, but this is about as close as you’re going to get without stopping the fans altogether.

Features

There are a few features of note with the HAF 932. The Near complete toolless nature of the chassis is very nice to see. The push button setup for the optical drives is slightly better than the clips found on the PCI brackets, but in both instances they’re more than usuable and certainly strong enough to hold their respective hardware in place.

Cable management is reasonably well handled with plenty of holes to route cables through. Each one of them also has rounded or rubberised edges which helps avoid cable shearing and finger cuts which are commonplace in nasty, cheap chassis. There’s also quite a few clips that would make it easy to attach cable ties to the motherboard tray, keeping things very neat.

As far as the newly added features of the advanced, like the interior paint job and the USB 3.0 ports, I think they’re a nice improvement. It always looks crap without a bit of internal colouring so its become a bit of a necessity in recent years. The USB 3.0 ports are a welcome addition, especially since they’re internally powered, so they’re nice and future proofed. Even if you don’t have a motherboard that supports this at the moment they’re there for when you do; though be aware they will have contributed to the price tag a little.

I also really liked the fact that the PSU has its own air intake, and that it has a slidable bottom tray that helps support it. However, in this instance and on each fan there are grills, but no dust filters. Massive oversight. All cases should include them. If I’m spending around £100 on a case, I want dust filters.

Cost

As stated in a couple lines above, you’re looking to shell out arund £100 for this one.