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    Categories: Cases

Cooler Master Silencio 650

Introduction

Cooler Master have been around since 1992 and when it comes to building cases, Cooler Master know what they’re doing.

Today I’m looking at the Cooler Master Silencio 650 which is described by Cooler Master to be “extremely silent” and “wonderfully simplistic”. Let’s find out whether these statements are correct.

Specifications

  • Available Color: Full Midnight Black
  • Materials: Aluminum Alloy, Synthetics, Steel
  • Dimension (W x H x D): 207 x 479 x 525.6mm / 8.1 x 18.8 x 20.7 inch
  • Net Weight: 13.0 kg / 28.6 lb
  • M/B Type: Micro-ATX, ATX
  • 5.25″ Drive Bays: 3 (w/o the use of exposed 3.5″ drive bay)
  • 3.5″ Drive Bays: 7 (hidden) + 1 (for X-Dock bay)
  • 2.5″ Drive Bays: 2 (hidden) +1 (for X-Dock bay)
  • I/O Panel: USB 3.0 x 2 (int.), USB 2.0 x 2, Mic x 1,
  • Expansion Slots: 7+1
  • 120mm fan x 2, 1200 RPM, 17 dBA /
  • 140mm fan x 1 (optional)
  • Top: 120mm or 140mm fan x 1 (optional)
  • Rear: 120mm fan x 1, 1200 RPM, 17 dBA
  • Bottom: 120mm fan x 1 (optional)
  • HDD cage: 120mm fan x 1 (optional, on removable HDD cage)
  • Power Supply Type: Standard ATX PS2 / EPS 12V
  • Maximum Compatibility VGA card length : 268.0 mm / 10.5 inch (with HDD cage)
  • 434.0 mm / 17.1 inch (without HDD cage)
  • CPU cooler height: 168.0 mm / 6.6 inch
 

What’s in the box?

Included is 10 hard drive rails, POST speaker, cable ties, all sorts of screws, manual, 2.5” to 3.5” adaptor for using 2.5” devices in the front hot-swap bay and a padlock mount which allows you to secure your case, especially useful at LAN events.

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Exterior

Starting at the front we have a very sleek, simplistic, door which opens either way.

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Opening the door we find a thick layer of noise isolating foam and magnets to keep the door closed.

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From the top we have two 5.25” bays and a single X-dock hot swap bay.

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Further down we have a filtered cover, it would have been nice if this would have been a more open design so it didn’t restrict the air.

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Removing the cover/filter allows us to see the two 120mm 1200RPM fans, these can be removed and a single 140mm fan can be installed in either the top or bottom position.

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The sides are both the same and at the front we have some vents that help the fans intake cool air and at the bottom there are four rubber feet and a plastic part in the middle.

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Around the back, starting from the top we have two water cooling grommets for pipes to pass through, the IO area where you install the OI shield plate that comes with your motherboard, a 120mm 1200RPM exhaust fan, 7+1 expansion slots and a place to install your PSU whichever way up you prefer.

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The bottom has a large filter which filters the PSU’s fan and the air inlet on the bottom, a 120mm fan can be placed here. The four rubber feet are soft and will ensure the case doesn’t scratch any surface it is left on.

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The top is quite plain with the covers closed.

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With the covers opened we see a spot to mount a 120mm or 140mm exhaust fan along with the power and reset buttons, two USB 2.0, two USB 3.0, head phone and microphone jacks, SD card reader, dual boot hard drive switch, fan controller switch that switches the stock fans between 1200 and 700 RPM.

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Interior

The case is only a Mid ATX case but the interior is surprisingly spacey.

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The two 5.25” tool less mechanisms are well made.

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There are 7 3.5” bays and two trays that allow you to mount 2.5” drives. The top section can be removed to allow you to install long graphics cards but this shouldn’t be an issue, the bay can also be rotated.

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This is the rear of the X-dock, it uses a four pin Molex and SATA to transfer power and data.

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It’s hard to make a hoo-haa about a stand-off but this is not just a regular stand-off, it is in fact a completely awesome idea, it really makes me wonder why no one else has these. When you place your motherboard in your case, you normally have to apply pressure against the IO shield plate to get your screws in and it’s hard to get it central. This very simple stand-off fits the hole in the motherboard perfectly, meaning when you install your motherboard in the case, you align the holes, sit it in place and simply install the screws. It’s a great, simple idea and I hope other manufacturers learn and included them.

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The included cables, it’s good to see more budget cases come with the USB 3.0 plug.

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Black cables, great to see!

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All fans have 3 pin to molex adaptors.

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The top of the case has some noise isolating foam and you can see the 120mm and 140mm fan mounting holes.

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Around the back of the case we see the three rubber grommets, from our experience it’s a good idea to be gentle with these as the fingers can be ripped quite easily. The case could do with being slightly wider to allow more space around the back, the large hole down at the bottom helps but with the side panel also having noise isolating foam on, the foam grips on any cables and makes it hard to close the side panel.

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At the bottom of the last picture you probably noticed this little PCB; it’s what switches the two bottom drives for dual booting. It’s important to know that the molex on this also powers the built in fan controller, it took us a minute to work this out as we didn’t want to use the dual boot feature but wanted to test the fan controller.

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We very quickly and roughly put some parts in the case, this was the result. All the work to make the case easy to build in really pays off; it’s a brilliant case to build a system in.

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Testing

Build Quality

Build quality is something Cooler Master does very well; nothing they do is “Cheap” feeling. The steel in the case is certainly quite thick which really helps to make it feel well built but that’s not all that makes for a well-built case, the panel gaps are all tight and the plastics all feel really good too.

Noise and Cooling

The case is quiet, really quiet, thanks to all the noise isolating foam and fans that can be set to run at only 700RPM makes for a super quiet case.
Having two 120mm fans in the front really helps bring cool air in and the single 120mm at the rear is enough to remove heated air from the case.

Features

The Silencio 650 is quite a feature packed case considering its price. Our favourite features included the super useful stand-offs, card reader, built in fan controller, sound isolating foam, 100% filtered inlets and plenty of cooling potential.

 

Conclusion

To round up the Silencio 650, its quiet, stays cool and looks extremely professional and sleek. Building a system in the case was easy; everything went in very easily thanks to it being quite spacey. There isn’t anything we don’t like about the case, it’s well made and well thought out.

The case is on sale for £102. This may seem a lot for a mid-ATX case but considering the outstanding features included, it’s highly recommended.

Pros

  • Excellent quality
  • Easy to build a system in
  • Priced fairly
  • Quiet and cool
  • Can fit very long graphics cards

Cons

  • Delicate rubber Grommets
  • Rear side panel can be difficult to install due to thick 24 pin cables although doesn’t bow out like other cases

William Hemmens :

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